ESSAY MILLS ARE STILL LEGAL-ARE UNIVERSITIES SOFT ON CHEATING?

The Times tells us that a growing number of academics and registrars are backing the campaign by the Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education (QAA) to create a “hostile environment” for companies that charge students hundreds or thousands of pounds to write bespoke essays. The Minister Sam Gyimah  flagged this issue as one of his major concerns in his 5th  September speech. Endemic cheating could mean  that some universities are starting to move away from essays to alternative assessment or a greater focus on exams.  But the system seems to have been remarkably slow at responding to this issue.

Essay Mills’ provide custom written essays for students to cheat with. Prices range from a couple of hundred pounds for a single essay to over £6,750 for a PhD dissertation. This undermines the high standards of universities and is unfair to honest students – but is currently legal. Strange that. Jim Dickinson tested the water recently when he   tweeted ‘ ‘Can I pay someone else to write my assignment?’ and was inundated with replies offering assistance. For example: @perfectessays49 Replying to @jim_dickinson

‘Hello there, I am an experienced writer and I would like to offer assistance on your essay. Just DM me the instructions so I can get started 7:43 AM – 2 Sep 2018.

And‏ @TrustedWriters  Sep 2 Replying to @jim_dickinson ‘Hello, I can ace the assignment for you. Kindly DM for a deal.’

It does rather beg the question- Are Universities soft on cheating? After all, removing students costs them, and it could cost them quite a lot.  If you dismiss an international student, for example,  for cheating- how much would that cost? In 2017, international students paid between £10,000 and £35,000 a year for an undergraduate degree, although medical degrees at some of the best universities went up to £38,000 a year.  It really isnt terribly difficult to spot cheats. There is software available and  half competent  tutors with some awareness of their students abilities and writing styles  should be  able to spot  discrepancies and warning signs.Students also leave digital footprints.

Students of course should  be warned about Essay Mills too. They need to be made aware that not only do these Mills charge quite a lot of money,  (most students are not cash rich)many of them ,  indeed most, are not very good at essay writing, nor, indeed   at answering the question. Formulaic answers are commonplace. If you want a First Class Degree or good 2;1 forget it.  Students also expose themselves to a risk of blackmail. And if things go horribly wrong, and they receive a poor grade , there are no come backs. If you get caught cheating it is somewhat career limiting, and you will carry that baggage for the rest of your life. In terms of risks and returns its a no brainer.  Dont do it!

Its good that the Minister Sam Gyimah ,who seems to be thriving in his current role, is taking a keen  personal interest in this issue.

 

Advertisements

CAREER EDUCATION – WILL SOMEONE TELL MINISTERS WHAT IT MEANS ?

Lack of  clarity at heart of government policy on careers  .

Sam Gyimah, the Minister responsible for Careers guidance in schools, has recently been referring to  the importance of career education. Well , it  is important ,but  it is not at all clear that he understands what it means. If you look at his comments, in context, he seems to be talking not about career education but  instead  about work related learning and employer engagement. Worthy though that might be, it  is not the same as career education.   But he  is not alone in repeating this misunderstanding. This week researchers from the University of Bath told us how important career education is, and its impact on young peoples   future earnings  The researchers say  ‘The ever changing education system confronted young people with a complex world. This has been partly addressed by government emphasis on career education while students are at school’. But the research  was focused on employer engagement with young people and its long term  benefits, not on career education.

The reality is -there   isn’t any emphasis on career education in schools. In fact, career education, as commonly understood, is  virtually non-existent in most schools  which lack a   strategic approach to the teaching, learning and assessment of career education . There may be more interaction between employers and students (although it would be interesting to see the data on this)  but that is not strictly speaking career education.

This could  go some way to explaining the confusion at the heart of the governments policy on careers and the fact that the Careers  and Enterprise Company are focused almost entirely now on employer engagement and championing what are termed  ‘Enterprise’ advisers.   They really do think that employer engagement is the same as career education (and Guidance too  it seems)

The Career Development Institute says about career education that it is   ‘Planned and progressive programmes of activities in the curriculum which help students to develop the knowledge and skills to understand themselves, research the opportunities available, make decisions and move successfully on to the next stage’.

Career guidance, offered by an independent qualified professional,  (signally lacking in too  many schools) plays a vital role in helping individuals make the decisions about learning and work that are right for them. But there is an underlying assumption that for this   to be  really effective,  young people  also need career education.  Meaning  young people   need to have the knowledge and skills to access and make good use of the information, advice and guidance they are given . They also need to be equipped with  the skills of career management to seek out opportunities, make successful applications and manage transitions. That is whats  accepted as  career education.  The OECD sees career education as integral to Career Guidance- so career education programmes involve specifically  help  and support  for individuals to  develop their ‘ self-awareness, opportunity awareness, and career management skills ‘(Career Guidance-A Handbook  for Policy Makers – OECD -2004)

And so its safe to assume that a Career educator is not  in fact an employer involved in an interaction with a young person but instead a qualified  professional  individual  with the right pedagogic approaches to develop individuals’ career management skills, to seek out opportunities manage transitions, and so on.

Work-related learning ,on the other hand, is a separate issue. This provides opportunities for young people to develop knowledge and understanding of work and enterprise, and  to develop skills for enterprise, something that Ministers talk about all the time. And this involves engagement between young people  with employers, enterprise advisers and, of course, combined with  access to  good quality work experience..

In a recent briefing paper for Careers England and CDI,   Tristram Hooley, Claire Johnson and Siobhan Neary gave an insight into the challenge faced by those who want to offer career education. . They   said  “The professional training and career progression for careers teachers and careers leaders in schools is less clearly defined.” But ,” While various attempts have been made to establish a CPD pathway for teachers who focus on careers work, these have generally had a limited reach into the teacher workforce.”

Tami McCrone of the NFER  in her recent evidence to the Select Committee wrote ‘I conclude that there is considerable robust evidence that suggests that quality careers advice provision would benefit from an equal focus on first laying the foundations with careers education and ensuring that parents are well-informed in terms of the careers education and guidance their children are receiving.’

So ,its pretty easy to conclude   that the government really  hasn’t been placing emphasis on career education, (if only it  had)

What it has been doing is  placing emphasis  on employer engagement and work related learning., important though that might be to the guidance offer.  But this is happening almost to the exclusion, of career education and genuine independent, professional guidance, including face to face guidance.(which evidence tells us benefits the most disadvantaged pupils, the most)

If you are unclear about what you are talking about, how will you get your policy right?

In the meantime the Careers and Enterprise company (CEC)  would have us believe that it is transforming career guidance. What it  actually means is that  it is  increasing the level of engagement that young people have with  employers and enterprise advisers, which  is not the same as improving career guidance or  providing career education.

The CEC will be able to measure its inputs fairly easily, but will have a challenge on its hands  to measure its outputs, both in terms of the quality of the employer interventions it facilitates , the value they add, and.  more broadly on the impact the CEC is having  on  on the availability and accessibility  of  high quality professional career  guidance in schools.,to young people, particularly the most disadvantaged. .

It remains the case that young people in our schools are not getting better access to independent  professional careers guidance  than they did five years  ago,     then rated as  ‘poor’ and ‘patchy’. And  with the modest  resources that are available ,  going mainly to employer engagement, under the aegis of the CEC,  this is unlikely to change.