WHAT IS THE COALITION GOVERNMENTS POLICY ON SCHOOLS COLLABORATION?

 

The government recognises the importance of school to school collaboration

Comment

 

In its response to an Education Select Committee report  on school partnerships and co-operation the government said:

‘The government’s vision is for a self-improving, school-led system where schools and teachers are able to respond to local need through school-to-school support and collaboration. These principles form the basis of the teaching school model, where partnerships are formed through alliances and, in some cases, through more formalised networks. We will continue to explore whether there is a greater role for government in helping schools to identify and understand the characteristics of effective partnership and collaboration to support more school-to-school working.’

‘The evidence shows that, rather than having a negative impact on a school’s attainment levels, working with others improves a school’s outcomes. Chapman’s research for the National College on federations showed that in this model both the weaker school and the strong supporting school see an increase in performance.’

Note 1 Recent research suggests that one example of successful school collaboration across a system, driving improvements in performance, is the London Challenge.

Introduced in 2003,  it was a partnership between central and local government, targeting intensive support on the capital’s most deprived boroughs. Between 2003 and 2006 the proportion of students with five or more GCSE passes at A* to C rose faster in London than nationally – and even faster in the disadvantaged boroughs.

Note 2 Chapman et al, (2011) A study of the impact of school federations on student outcomes, National College

http://dera.ioe.ac.uk/12140/1/download%3Fid%3D155373%26filename%3Dthe-impact-of-school-federation-on-student-outcomes.pdf

SourceGovernment response to Education Select Committee report  School Partnerships and Cooperation -20 January 2014

 

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