NEET FIGURE FAR TOO HIGH

NEET FIGURE

There are still far too may young people not in education employment or training

Comment

Most people agree that the NEET figure, although difficult to calculate, as the numbers and characteristics of young people who are NEET vary significantly between local areas and  the figures are subject  to constant ‘churn’, is too high.

The most recent figures show that the number of young people not in education, employment or training (NEET) are:

At age 16-18, the official statistics published on 22 June 2010 showed that 183,000 (9.2%) young people in England were NEET at the end of 2009.

For the broader 16-24 age range, the quarterly Labour Force Survey data published on 20 May 2010 showed that 927,000 (15.3%) of young people in England were NEET in the first quarter of 2010.

What  about international comparisons? International figures show that other nations are outpacing us on both the proportion of young people participating in education and training and the percentage who are NEET. The most recent OECD comparisons of the proportion of 15-19 year olds NEET at the end of 2007 showed that the UK had the third highest rate of the 24 countries that supplied data.

Given that local authorities are cutting back on the Connexions service and careers information and guidance it  is  unlikely that this figure will improve any time soon.  Pity.

See the Governments response to the Select Committee report on NEET-27 July

http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm201011/cmselect/cmeduc/416/41604.htm

See also:

DfE: Participation in Education, Training and Employment by 16-18 Year Olds in England (June 2010)-http://www.dcsf.gov.uk/rsgateway/DB/SFR/s000938/index.shtml

Labour Force Survey reported in DfE: NEET Statistics-Quarterly Brief (May 2010)-http://www.dcsf.gov.uk/rsgateway/DB/STR/d000924/index.shtml  Both of these statistics relate to young people’s academic age

Education at a Glance 2009: OECD Indicators-http://www.oecd.org/document/24/0,3343,en_2649_39263238_43586328_1_1_1_1,00.html

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